A Day in the Life of a Flight Attendant

Have you ever wondered what a flight attendant’s regular routine looks like? 

 

At the start of each month, flight attendants get their schedules and list of destinations. They could be working anywhere between nine to 20 days a month, but some of the newer ones would be “on-call” and may need to go in last minute. They are subjected to a variety of long flights, domestic, international, or even night flights.

 

Flight attendants have to get to the airport hours before the plane is even there to get everything ready. A day before they go in the air, all their stuff is packed in a small luggage. Depending on the flight, some of them have to wake up before the sun rises. So if you’re the kind who is always late, then you might want to reexamine your habits before getting into this career.

 

Before heading to the airport, they get their hair and makeup perfect. They have to pass by security at the airport like the rest of us, but they usually have a separate security check, which is significantly shorter. 

 

Pre-Flight

flight attendant life

 

Flight attendants converge in a lounge for the cabin crew and have a short briefing with the rest of the group. It’s mostly to review safety procedures and the details of the flight. They’ll also be informed of any special-needs passengers.

 

After that, they take an exclusive bus to the plane to check all the equipment beforehand. They check the first aid equipment, fire extinguisher, microphone, overhead bins, doors, food, and many others. Each person is assigned a different station, and they can actually bid to be the leader of the group.

 

Most of the time, you’ll be working with a different cabin crew on every flight, so it’s a great time to get to know each other. Once everything is done, it’s time for the passengers to get in. It’s only when everyone is in and the doors are closed do their hours start ticking.

 

After the Flight

 

Once everyone is off the plane, the crew checks each of their stations again and completes the necessary forms. They leave the area and board their company-issued transportation to their hotels.

 

The flexible schedule means you can choose which layovers and how many days of rest you get in between. Some just have under 10 hours of break while others could be staying there for almost two days. Once it’s time to head back, it’s the same process all over again!

 

Being an attendant for over 10 hours is definitely tiring, and all that time spent away from home can be hard for some. It’s all worth it, though, if you think of all the new and exciting adventures you can have around the world! If you think you’re ready for a life like this, then take the first step by signing up for Eton College’s Flight Attendant Program today.